Progress with Nicola Jarvis Loveday Epic Crewel Work Sampler

The Apple Blossom:

Have really loved embroidering this motif. We started the apple blossom during the course at Hampton Court Palace in August. However, sat at home by myself in Berwick upon Tweed, things have not always been plain sailing! Though I’ve enjoyed every minute, there have been mistakes a plenty and lots of cursing!!!

I thought about removing them. But, because I have to look at them every time I sit down at my frame, they spur me on to do better and avoid making the same mistakes again. So, if I was to give myself advice, what would I say:

1. Always read the instructions carefully…should go without saying, but when you worked all day, are tired and have back ache….

2. Always split stitch the outer edges of the petals as this really makes the blossoms stand proud. I forgot to do this for one of the blossoms because I was listening to Star Trek Voyager!

3. Keep your thread length as short as you can bear, because if you don’t, your thread will be worn bare by the time it runs out and your stitching will look uneven, as mine does in places.

4. Vary your long and short stitch lengths randomly and try to avoid overlapping your threads as you lay your stitches down. You will avoid my unwanted raised surfaces.

5. Think before you stitch. What effect do you want to achieve and, if you place your thread in a particular position, and in a certain direction, will you be happy with the end result

What next, the tree trunk in stem stitch.

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Mrs Lantz refers firstly to the group: Mosaics. Then the stitch: a flat. The pattern includes a Filler stitch, the Upright Cross. Refer to page 95.

This is my sixth sampler. I’ve used three shades of 2-ply Appletons crewel wool. I feel my interpretation edges towards softness because the wool thickness is delicate, almost ghost-like, giving rise to feint movement perhaps? Maybe my overactive imagination.

I think my artistic presentation could be better though! Having trouble with formatting tonight.

Mrs Lantz refers to the design sources as follows:

1. Wall design from the Wilton Diptych (1380), held at the National Gallery.

2. Hugo van der Goes painting, 15th century, in reverse shading (Kaiser Friedrich Museum). She does not identify which painting includes the design. I will do some research and upload if able.

Daily weekday needlepoint sampler using the stitch templates provided by Sheree Lantz in her ‘A Pageant of Pattern for Needlepoint Canvas’.’

Mrs Lantz refers firstly to the group: Mosaics. Then the stitch: a flat. Refer to page 99. The design is a border pattern.

This is my fifth sampler. I’ve used four shades of Appletons crewel wool, and varied the thickness of the threads to create a more pronounced effect for some of aspects of the pattern.

She states the source design is inspired by Norman-Moorish medieval pavement mosaic, at La Capella Di Sam Pietro, Palermo. The photographs below can be found on Wikipedia and provide an example of a mosiac pavement design. The photograph was taken by Berthold Werner.

Daily weekday needlepoint sampler using the stitch templates provided by Sheree Lantz in her ‘A Pageant of Pattern for Needlepoint Canvas’.’

This is my fourth sampler from page 94.

Mrs Lantz refers firstly to the group: Mosaics. Then the stitch: a flat stitch. She indicates that the pattern is still used in American patchwork quilting, and is known as the Ohio Star, and sometimes the ‘Shoo Fly’. I’ve used three shades of tapestry thread which help to give it a chunkier, hard wearing appearance.

She states the source design is inspired by:

* Roman mosaic pavement which can be seen at the Museo Antichita in Trieste.

* A 13th century marble panel at the church of Santa Maria in Rome.

* A 14th century Sienese painting, Madonna of Humility by Benedetto di Bindo, housed at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. (This image has been taken from Wikipedia Media and is an artwork in the public domain.)

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